Hospital Procedures Consultants

Our Hospitalist Procedures and Emergency Procedures Courses are ideal for all physicians, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, nurse anesthetists (CRNA), residents or students practicing hospital medicine, critical care, or emergency medicine. HPC conferences are certified for CME credit; 10 hours of credit for the one-day course and 20 hours of credit for the two-day course.  Live course students also obtain an additional 11.5 hours CME credit for the Online CME course that contains all the course didactics.  Live courses qualify for 16 hours of Trauma CME credit and the two day courses fulfill all 30 hours of emergency procedures CME needed for Emergency Nurse Practitioner certification.  Our courses also fulfill the emergency procedures training in airway management and bedside procedures needed to obtain the certificate of added qualification in emergency medicine for physician assistants provided through the NCCPA.

WASHINGTON D.C. COURSE IS SOLD OUT.  PLEASE CONTACT US IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO BE ADDED TO WAITING LIST.

CLICK HERE  TO SEE WHY HPC OFFERS MORE IN 1 DAY COURSE THAN OUR COMPETITORS DO IN 2 DAYS!

Latest News in Continuing Medical Education

Higher Baseline Serum Creatinine Increases Mortality for Hospitalized Patients with Cirrhosis

by Joseph Esherick, M.D., FAAFP, FHM

This study showed that a rise in serum creatinine (SCr) of 0.7 mg/mL from baseline had 68% sensitivity and 80% specificity for predicting 30-day mortality in hospitalized patients with cirrhosis. This level of acute kidney injury (AKI) also doubled the chance of mortality within 30 days compared with cirrhotic patients without AKI.

A Negative High-Sensitivity Troponin and Reassuring EKG Can Rule out Acute MI

by Joseph Esherick, M.D., FAAFP, FHM

This meta-analysis demonstrates that a negative high-sensitivity cardiac troponin measured at least 3 hours after symptom onset in association with an EKG with no evidence of ischemia or injury can effectively rule out an acute myocardial infarction (AMI).

The subclavian vein may be the preferred location over IJ and Femoral Locations for Central Line Placement

by Joseph Esherick, M.D., FAAFP, FHM

This prospective randomized study of complications related to central line location favors subclavian lines over internal jugular lines and femoral lines.