Las Vegas
January 27-28, 2018
Few Spots Left for Sunday Course
Weekend and Saturday Courses Sold Out
Hospitalist and Emergency Procedures Course
Chicago
April 21-22, 2018
Hospitalist and Emergency Procedures Course
Washington, DC
June 24-25, 2018
Hospitalist and Emergency Procedures Course
Long Beach, California
August 3-4, 2018 AND
August 5-6, 2018
Both Two-Day Courses
Hospitalist and Emergency Procedures Course
Seattle
September 22-23, 2018
Hospitalist and Emergency Procedures Course
San Antonio
November 3-4, 2018
Hospitalist and Emergency Procedures Course

Hospital Procedures Consultants

Our Hospitalist and Emergency Procedures Courses are ideal for all physicians, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, nurse anesthetists (CRNA), residents or students practicing hospital medicine, critical care, or emergency medicine. Live courses qualify for 16 hours of Trauma CME credit and the two day courses fulfill all 30 hours of emergency procedures CME needed for Emergency Nurse Practitioner certification. Our courses also fulfill the emergency procedures training in airway management and bedside procedures needed to obtain the certificate of added qualification in emergency medicine for physician assistants provided through the NCCPA. We are teachers invested in your success.

CME That Saves Lives

Live CME Course

Live CME Course

Learn Anywhere on Your Own Time

Online CME Course

Online CME Course

Procedural Experts Come to You

Custom Course

Custom Course

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HPC Products

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HPC Products

Reference Cards   |   Videos   |   Online Course   |   Books
Premier Procedural Expert Instructors

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Get the HPC Experience

Procedure Of The Week
Thoracentesis photo

Ultrasound-guided thoracentesis training

Blog of the Week
Iso-osmolar Contrast Rarely Causes Contrast-induced Nephropathy
by Joseph Esherick, M.D., FAAFP, FHM
November 14, 2017

This study supports that intravenous contrast−enhanced computed tomography was NOT associated with acute kidney injury.

Procedure of the Week
How to Differentiate Pleural Effusion Exudates from Transudates
by Joseph Esherick, M.D., FAAFP, FHM
November 14, 2017

This meta-analysis analyzed 20 studies and nearly 3,500 patients. The study found that, on the average, a pleural cholesterol level of 55 mg/L or more had an 88% sensitivity, 96% specificity and positive likelihood ratio for an exudate of 20.3. On the other hand, a pleural cholesterol level below 55 mg/L has a negative likelihood ratio of 0.12 suggesting a transudate. In addition a pleural fluid/serum cholesterol ratio of 0.3 or more has 94% sensitivity and 87% specificity for a pleural exudate. A P/S cholesterol ratio less than 0.3 has a negative likelihood ratio of 0.07.3