Glidescope Intubation Course

A Glidescope is a device that is used for difficult airway management. A Glidescope usually provides better visualization of the larynx compared with direct laryngoscopy when you need to maintain cervical immobilization, have excessive oral secretions, or anticipate a very anterior larynx.  The Glidescope intubation course features two Glidescope machines to train students how to use video laryngoscopy for pediatric intubations and adult intubations.

Our Glidescope intubation training is a component of our live Hospitalist and Emergency Procedures CME course which teaches clinicians how to perform the 20 most essential procedures needed to work in the ER, ICU, and hospital wards.

CLICK HERE to find out more about our premier live Hospitalist and Emergency Procedures CME course

Glidescope Intubation Course

Glidescope Intubation Lab Photos

Glidescope Intubation Video

Glidescope Intubation Video

 

Glidescope Intubation Course trains students in:

 

  • Indications for a endotracheal intubation
  • Contraindications to endotracheal intubation
  • Complications of endotracheal intubation
  • Equipment for a Glidescope intubation
  • Proper positioning for a Glidescope intubation
  • Training in adult Glidescope intubation
  • Training in pediatric Glidescope intubation
  • Options for Difficult Airway Management
  • Times to consider video laryngoscopy over direct laryngoscopy
  • Options for the Can't Ventilate Can't Intubate scenario
  • Coding for endotracheal intubation

Additional Information:

Glidescope intubation (also referred to as video laryngoscopy) is often compared to the direct laryngoscopy procedure.  Some physicians enthusiastically support the use of Glidescope intubation / video laryngoscopy as the best practice in almost every case, but there is also evidence to support the use of direct laryngoscopy in certain circumstances.

Glidescope intubation was ultimately developed because some hospitalists and emergency physicians were not satisfied with direct laryngoscopy's ability to provide a reliable and consistent view for endotracheal intubation.

Glidescope intubation's advantages compared to direct laryngoscopy are numerous and include a higher success rate compared to direct layrngoscopy - this is particularly true in more challenging cases.  Glidescope intubation is typically preferred in cases where you have to perform an awake intubation or a non-paralyzed intubation.  Glidescope intubation also has a lower chance of an inadvertent esophageal intubation.

Direct laryngoscopy's advantages include that the procedure is more easily performed in a variety of locations in which Glidescope equipment may be difficult to transport.  Direct laryngoscopy may also be more practical if the procedure needs to be performed outdoors or in natural sunlight – the Glidescope monitor may experience some issue with glare from natural light.

Physicians who are very experienced and skilled in direct laryngoscopy may find the Glidescope method counterintuitive to what they're accustomed to using with the direct method.  Regardless of which method is preferred by a particular physician or midlevel provider, all clinicians practicing emergency medicine or hospital medicine need to be capable using either method.

If you're a physician practicing emergency medicine, a nurse practitioner, physician assistant, or a medical student considering the emergency medicine field, then it is valuable to understand the various approaches and options available.

 

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Glidescope Intubation Photos

Rapid Sequence Intubation Reference Card

Rapid Sequence Intubation Reference Card

Rapid Sequence Intubation Reference Card

Glidescope Intubation Blogs

Emergency Department Intubations Are Increasingly Successful

by Joseph Esherick, M.D., FAAFP, FHM

First-pass ED intubation success increased from 80% in 2002 to 86% in 2012, with concomitant increases in the use of video laryngoscopy and rocuronium.

Which cirrhotic patients are at high risk for bleeding during hospital procedures?

by Joseph Esherick, M.D., FAAFP, FHM

This blog will offer some expert recommendations to help guide the safety of hospital procedures at different platelet and coagulation profiles.

Why are Patients with Cirrhosis Readmitted to the Hospital?

by Joseph Esherick, M.D., FAAFP, FHM

Top causes for hospital readmission in patients with cirrhosis were acute complications of cirrhosis (especially hepatic encephalopathy), substance abuse, and cancer complications.

Safety of Draining Patients Dry During Large Volume Thoracentesis

by Joseph Esherick, M.D., FAAFP, FHM

A historical myth in procedural medicine is the operator should limit removal of pleural fluid to 1.5 L during thoracentesis because of the risk of re-expansion pulmonary edema or pneumothorax. New evidence supports safety of large volume thoracentesis until no fluid remains.

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  1. 12 month online access to Online CME course, procedure video bundle, instructional posters
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